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How mobile is changing customer relationships

How mobile is changing customer relationships

Just ten short years ago, the volume of content either consumed or created on a mobile device was shockingly little. Today, the superphone has become the primary medium via which brands engage with users - including a broad spectrum of console-quality videogames, many channels for high-quality video, and a wide range of social media channels.

Kristina: How has the landscape of the human narrative transformed because of mobile devices?

John Sangiovanni, Co-Founder and Vice President, Product Design, Zumobi: With the exception of an occasional BlackBerry email, MMS'd low-res photo, or simplistic J2ME game - users, brands, and publishers did not view mobile devices as a core content platform. With the rapid and enduring curve of iOS, Android, App Stores, YouTube, social media, phablets, and more, this perspective has changed dramatically. In the future history of human communication, it's hard to think of a more suitable label for this past decade than "The Age of the Superphone."

Kristina: How has the shift to the mobile platform and the perpetually engaged and expectant consumer led to new branded opportunities, targeting, beacons, geo-local opps., etc.?

John: Historically, media was planned and programmed based on very few factors: Audience, time-of-day and perhaps, gross location (as in geo/metro or city). The wars of media programming were fought over the precious primetime slots attracting the largest audience, or tailored content designed to attract a specific demographic of interest to advertisers. Mobile devices now enable us to add a dizzying array of new pivots to this equation... in addition to time and audience, we can add precise location (within mere FEET, in the case of iBeacons), device, installed apps, purchase intent, and even content affinity. These new targeting capabilities have given rise to highly thoughtful media strategies that endeavor to reach a consumer at the precise nanosecond when they're most likely to engage, participate, or purchase.

Read the expert Q&A facilitated by Kristina Knight here on BizReport.

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